Amazing Menu

Chef Daria's Amazing Menu — England

As you’ll see below, there are certainly lots of great recipes available online for anyone who wants to explore British cuisine and eat well both at once.
Introduction

I am not exactly an Anglophile (for that, see the culture report!), but I’ve never understood the disdain some people have for British food. Yes, it can be a bit heavy, but not necessarily. As you’ll see below, there are certainly lots of great recipes available online for anyone who wants to explore British cuisine and eat well both at once. And that goes vegetarians, too.

And this is not a recent development. Medieval Anglo Saxon recipes were pretty complex for that era. Zipping ahead to the Internet era, we have another recipe lady this week, a virtual Fern of the kitchen named Helen, who has an impressive recipe collection indeed. Yay, Helen!


Soups/Salads/Appetizers

Since we’re visiting the land of the Beatles, perhaps we should start with Paul and Linda McCartney’s split pea soup, which can easily be made vegan. A couple of traditional soups include mushroom and barley soup, which can also be adapted for vegans, and smoked haddock chowder, which cannot. Mulligatawny soup comes from the Raj, which makes is quite appropriate since this season of TAR also went to India. This is a vegetarian version, but I’ve made it with chicken, and the web offers thousands of permutations of this recipe.

Moving on to more solid foods, we have beetroot, potato, apple, and chive salad. As a mayonnaise-phobe, I was a bit put off by this recipe for mushroom and stilton mousse, but it’s a good concept, and if you don’t share my culinary idiosyncrasies, you might enjoy it.



Meat/Fish

Let’s start with the heavy stuff! Steak pie with cheese crust sounds hearty enough to get you through the warmest winter. Granted, it’s almost summer, but the recipe will probably still be there six months from now, so you might want to bookmark it. Similarly, beef Wellington is a classic, and Helen makes it sound so simple. After your first meal from this recipe for baked lamb with rosemary, you should have plenty of leftovers that you can serve cold with a horseradish sauce.

Want something lighter? Try duck with orange salsa. Mmmm! Betcha didn’t know that orange salsa was invented by the Druids. Now you do. (And that’s a joke, okay?) Quails on mushrooms is a bit complicated, so be sure you read the recipe all the way through before you commit to it. On the other hand, Helen’s baked trout with cucumber sauce couldn’t be easier.


Vegetarian

Did you check out the soups? Three of the four are either vegetarian or easily made as vegetarian. For an entrée, you might want to try shepherdless pie, which I am recommending despite its call for a can of creamed corn. Black-eyed beans with spinach incorporates balsamic vinegar, which is about as native to Britain as is orange salsa, but who cares? Sweet potatoes with shiitake mushrooms has a fusion element as well, but a great recipe is a great recipe, n’est pas?


Desserts/Baked Goods
And now we are in trouble, because the Brits know their sweets. Boy, do they ever!
And now we are in trouble, because the Brits know their sweets. Boy, do they ever! We’ll start with English trifle, then visit Helen again for mincemeat parcels, peach fool, and sticky toffee pudding. Like I said, we’re in trouble now.


More

Be sure and check out Helen’s site if you want to explore beyond the recipes above. Her updated classics are easy to follow. Beyond her site, we have the usual suspects: recipezaar, Sally’s place, astray.com, recipesource.com, and the much-loved Food Down Under. Enjoy!