Amazing Menu

Chef Daria's Amazing Menu — Germany

Sally’s place tells us all about German food traditions, provides some recipes, discusses ingredients, offers a crossword puzzle, and otherwise gives us just enough information to get in trouble with.
Fortunately, there are many, many websites with German recipes. A lot of these are in German (the nerve!), but about half a kazillion are in English, so we’re set! Some of these Germans with recipe websites are quite charming, and their sites merit a visit just so you can feel all warm and fuzzy, regardless of whether the food is any good. Sally’s place tells us all about German food traditions, provides some recipes, discusses ingredients, offers a crossword puzzle, and otherwise gives us just enough information to get in trouble with. The only unfortunate thing is the possible need for conversion information, but otherwise, most of these sites are a lot of fun to visit.



Soups/salads:

What’s an elderberry? Other than an ingredient in elderberry soup? They’re sort of like grapes, but not really. Fewer questions arise from the ingredients in beer soup. This cucumber salad* requires a brief marinating, while the lentils in lentil salad need about the same amount of cooking time.


Meat/fish:

Let’s start with the meat. We have recipes for German applesauce meatloaf and grilled bratwurst with onions and peppers. This Jagerschnitzel* from our new friend Cindy sounded more interesting than the traditional weinerschnitzel, mostly because of the mushroom sauce. And did you ever wonder about sauerbraten? It’s got vinegar in it, and otherwise sounds like a hearty beef dish. Read the instructions carefully — it requires several days in a marinade.

I’ll order duck every time I see it on a menu, and this marinated duck breast sounds excellent. The “Italian vinegar” looks like it ought to be “balsamic vinegar.” And because we haven’t had enough eel recipes in this column, try this recipe for green eel (“flower” should be “flour”).

Oh, and there’s also a collection of German meat dishes. Carnivores, have at it!



Vegetarian:

Change the chicken broth to vegetable broth, and you’ve got a vegetarian variation of this Bavarian potato salad. Or, you could try carrots in beer. We’ll stay away from traditional sauerkraut and instead try braised red cabbage with apples. We also have a mushroom ragout with cheese dumplings. Oh, and veggie pie.



Dessert:

Germany, land of a million dessert recipes! Let’s go with some of the classics. For example, everyone has heard of apple strudel and Black Forest cake*. Then you can try the cherry dessert Meeresburg or a nice Bavarian plum cake.
Oh, and why is there no German chocolate cake here? Because that is not a German recipe, instead it was created by someone whose last name was “German.”
Are you desperate? Do you like chocolate pudding and cherries? Then this is for you. (Methinks there might be a translation idiosyncrasy in that title.) Oh, and why is there no German chocolate cake here? Because that is not a German recipe, instead it was created by someone whose last name was “German.”



More:

Oh, good grief, I could take another two pages to list all of these. So I won’t. But for the most-recipes-on-the-site contest, recipesource is a contender with 234 recipes, many of which are duplicates, but still enough to keep you busy. However, the 800-pound-gorilla of German recipe sites is recipeland, with 377 recipes. Then we have link heaven.

Our friends at Oklahoma State University have a good site with lots of German recipes. And someone named Cindy has a nice website with lots of well-organized German recipes. A German cookbook author, Marion, has had many of her recipes translated and posted on the Internet. A cook named Abigail did the same thing.

* site only works in Internet Explorer